Frequently Asked Questions

What is the purpose of the South Robertson Neighborhoods Council (SORO NC)?

SORO NC exists to provide a link between you, the stakeholders of this community, and the various city partners that manage the numerous functions of this city.  Los Angeles is a huge city with a  massive infrastructure, and many residents are often frustrated when trying to navigate the complicated path of local politics. We help facilitate communication between the City Council offices, LAPD, Street Services, LAUSD, and a variety of other departments. The yearly $37,000 funding we receive can be put towards projects and programs that benefit the general community, or target more specific groups or concerns.

What are the boundaries of the SORO NC?

The South Robertson Neighborhoods Council (SORO NC) is comprised of neighborhoods along South Robertson Boulevard, south of Beverly Hills, north of Culver City. Our western border is Beverwil and Roxbury Drives and our eastern border is La Cienega Boulevard. You can see and download a map here.

What does SORO NC do?

SORO NC conducts meetings throughout the month to get updates from city representatives and community groups, and receive input from stakeholders about issues and concerns. As needed, a committee crafts a 'motion', a formal proposal asking the NC to take action on some matter, which is presented to the full Board at the General Meeting. Motions cover such actions as submitting a letter to the city taking a stand on an issue, funding a new or continuing program, providing supplemental funding for a community or city event, etc. If the majority of the Board votes for a motion, it passes and the action is taken.

What type of activities does SORO NC help fund?

SORO NC funds programs to aid at-risk youth in the South Robertson area, provides assistance to the local schools, the fire department, the recreation center and other SORO entities, and contributes to the yearly South Robertson Festival. Stakeholders who have programs or events within the SORO boundaries are welcome to bring requests for funding to the appropriate committee for discussion, review and formation into a motion to be presented to the General Board. We are eager to expand our outreach within the community and bring in new ideas and projects.

Can anyone attend a meeting of the SORO NC? When does the Board meet?

The General Board Meeting and all action committee meetings are open to the public. The General Board meeting is at 7pm on the 3rd Thursday of the month at the Simon Wiesenthal Center. The underground parking entrance is on Roxbury. See our calendar for the meeting times of the action committees.

Where do you post meeting agendas?

In addition to the SORO NC website, we send agendas for all meetings to Demers & Associates, the Robertson Blvd Library, the Robertson Recreation Center, the Office of Councilmember Paul Koretz, Malcolm Brown Insurance Co., and Hamilton High School. You can also subscribe to get all of our agendas via email with the City's Early Notification Service—although there may be a delay of a day or more.

Who is eligible to be a member of SORO NC?

Our meetings and events are open to all community stakeholders – those who live, work, study, worship or are a member of a community group within our boundaries.

What or who is a SORO NC stakeholder?

Stakeholders are officially defined as "those who live, work or own real property in the neighborhood and also to those who declare a stake in the neighborhood as a community interest stakeholder, defined as a person who affirms a substantial and ongoing participation within the Neighborhood Council’s boundaries and who may be in a community organization such as, but not limited to, educational, non-profit and/or religious organizations."

How long does a Board member serve?

SORO NC has staggered four-year terms, with half of the Board seats up for election each even-numbered year. So in 2016, half of our seats will be elected; in 2018, the other half will be elected. The only exception is with our student School seat, which is appointed by the Board to a single-year term.

How is SORO NC governed?

Within the General Board of twenty-five representatives are the Council Executives—President, Vice President, Secretary and Treasurer. The SORO NC President runs each General Meeting, but all representatives have equal votes. Each action committee has either a chairperson or co-chairperson and these positions can be held by Boardmembers or stakeholders alike. As a functional part of local City government, SORO NC is subject to the provisions of the Ralph M. Brown Act.

How do I get involved in SORO NC?

The easiest way is to attend a meeting of the committee which addresses those community issues of most importance to you. You can also sign up to receive regular updates from SORO NC or attend a General Board Meeting. There you will hear what is happening with your area and you can speak with any of our Board members to get more information. Agendas for our meetings are posted monthly 72 hours in advance of the meeting. The General Board Meeting is an excellent way to get an idea of the scope of work covered by the Neighborhood Council, and a good way to meet the Boardmembers. Free food is usually served at all our General Board Meetings.

Is the SORO NC the same as a neighborhood association?

No. Neighborhood and homeowners associations are important stakeholders in the SORO NC, however, and their insights and input is often sought out. The different groups complement each other.

Is there a City Department that oversees SORO NC?

The Department of Neighborhood Empowerment (DONE) of the City of Los Angeles works with all NCs to provide advice, training, legal guidance and coordination of NC Board elections. Another group, the citizen-led Board of Neighborhood Commissioners (BONC), oversees DONE and sets policy for NC system.

Why should I be interested in SORO NC?

SORO NC is an advocate for the more than 45,000 residents, the businesses and organizations in our area and works with all the departments of local government and city officials to help improve the social and economic climate of our community. It receives $37,000 in taxpayer money per year to spend within our boundaries, which means that involved stakeholders have a real opportunity to create positive change in this community.

What's the deal with the name? Is "Neighborhoods" a typo?

The founders wanted to acknowledge that we represent a collection of neighborhoods, each with its own diverse characteristics. We're the only NC in the City that pluralizes "Neighborhoods," and we're proud of that.