Robertson I-10 Ramp Reconfiguration

Drivers in the SORO area are all too aware of the current issues with the local entrance and exit ramps to the I-10 Freeway. As LADOT and Caltrans put it:

The I-10 Freeway/Robertson/National area has a dysfunctional on/off-ramp configuration coupled with skewed intersection alignments of the major arterial streets. The current configurations and alignments create severe traffic circulation issues for motorists. As a result, the area suffers from poor traffic conditions as motorists travel circuitously to and from the freeway ramps...[The] ramps are located at different locations...This inconsistency leads to motorist confusion.

Inevitably, motorist confusion leads to accidents.

Community issues and priorities

Beyond the issues with freeway access, the ramps create problems in the community. 

The ramps were built in the early 1960s and effectively split the old Culver Junction business area in two. As a result, for 50 years Robertson Blvd. businesses withered, bearing the brunt of heavy north/south traffic to Century City and Fox Studios. Too narrow for its secondary highway designation, congestion on Robertson often pushes commuters into residential neighborhoods.

Further, the ramps make walking from SORO to the Robertson/Culver City EXPO station uninviting and, potentially, dangerous for residents and Hamilton High students. Westbound cars exit the I-10 directly across from the High School—often at speed—creating further pedestrian hazards.

With the on-going high-density development around the Robertson/Culver City EXPO station, those problems will increase. 

Finding solutions

LADOT and Caltrans have begun a project to fix the issues—although the project is still seeking final funding and no timeframe for construction has been set.

In March 2017, LADOT and Caltrans held a community meeting and presented four draft options. Note that the first three add a second ramp across from the High School. All four add a sidewalk next to the widened Robertson rather than creating a separate pedestrian pathway.

In the four Caltrans diagrams, yellow represents new roadway; blue represents closed roadway; and green represents properties that would have to be purchased.

Option 1

  • Keeps the westbound exit ramp across the street from Hamilton
  • Moves the westbound entrance ramp to be across from Hamilton as well
  • Connects the eastbound exit and entrance ramps to a new 4-way intersection on Robertson
  • Widens Robertson south of the 10 to accept more traffic

Option 2

  • Keeps the westbound exit ramp across the street from Hamilton
  • Moves the westbound entrance ramp to be across from Hamilton as well
  • Keeps the eastbound entrance ramp at National Blvd.
  • Lengthens the eastbound exit ramp to cross over Robertson and connect with National
  • Widens Robertson south of the 10 to accept more traffic

Option 3

  • Keeps the westbound exit ramp across the street from Hamilton
  • Moves the westbound entrance ramp to be across from Hamilton as well
  • Keeps the eastbound entrance ramp at National Blvd.
  • Connects the eastbound exit ramp to a new 4-way intersection on Robertson
  • Widens Robertson south of the 10 to accept more traffic

Option 4

  • Keeps the westbound exit ramp across the street from Hamilton
  • Connects the westbound entrance ramp and both eastbound ramps to a new, very large, 4-way intersection on Robertson
  • Widens Robertson south of the 10 to accept more traffic

Download the materials in PDF format:

They plan to hold another community meeting in September when they release the draft Environmental Impact Report (EIR). 

Making your voice heard

The lead consultants, Arellano Associates, have asked for community feedback. While it's up to you to assess pros and cons of the draft designs, some of the ideas expressed by the community at the meeting included:
  • Co-ordinate with Great Streets South Robertson to make sure the final ramp plan supports the larger goals of the community and doesn't undermine the City's Great Streets investment—particularly since Great Streets is also an LADOT project.
  • Create a safe pedestrian corridor between EXPO and Hamilton High, to encourage transit use, protect the hundreds of students who use EXPO daily, and to achieve the City's Vision Zero goals of eliminating pedestrian traffic fatalities.
  • Remove or relocate the ramp across from Hamilton altogether, also in support of Vision Zero and Great Streets goals.
  • Move freeway access to Venice (or National) to reduce traffic on Robertson, a street never designed to handle a high volume of cars.
  • Try to find a configuration that is less confusing.
  • Configure the ramps to create a new gateway business area with inviting retail stores.
  • Close all four Robertson ramps entirely, shifting traffic to La Cienega and Overland.
  • Or just leave things the way they are...no changes are needed.

Direct your comments to outreach lead Laura Muna-Landa

Email: I-10Robertson@ArellanoAssociates.com
Phone: 909-627-2974

It's also a good idea to copy our Council deputies (joseph.galloway@lacity.org and elizabeth.carlin@lacity.org) and the Neighborhood Council (vision@soronc.org).

Whatever your opinion, it is important that as many people in the neighborhood weigh in as possible, as soon as possible. As time passes and the project develops, it becomes harder to influence the final outcome.

Alternate ideas from the NC

The South Robertson Neighborhoods Council (SORO NC) maintains that an approach that puts pedestrians first and that works to solve the area’s overall circulation issues is not only possible, but also potentially more cost-effective.

To that end, we have developed three alternative plans. While the engineering aspects have yet to be assessed, SORO NC believes these new directional suggestions have numerous benefits over the four proposed options and hope they spark on-going and constructive dialogue between the community and the project team. You can download the Neighborhood Council's proposals here (9Mb file).