Green Team

Volunteer to Clean Up Pico Blvd.!

Join Councilmember Paul Koretz, Council District 5 staff, and SORO NC as we help make Pico shine.

Sunday, September 25 | 9am–noon
Parking Lot at 8866 W. Pico

As they say, many hands make light work, and past cleanups have been loads of fun and a great way to show your pride in SORO. You only have to bring a reusable water bottle and a smile—we'll supply the rest (courtesy of LA's Dept. of Sanitation). Be sure to be there at 9am sharp!

Download and print the flyer to help us get the word out.

Email paulawaxman@soronc.org to let us know you're coming, and be sure to invite your friends and family!

2015 SoRo Community Festival

SoRo Community Festival

Latest Twitter Updates




The 18th Annual SoRo Community Festival will take place on Sunday, June 7, 2015 from 11 am to 4 pm. The Festival is located on South Robertson Boulevard, between Cattaraugus and Beverlywood St. (just north of Hamilton High School and the 10 Freeway). Free street parking is also available.

Free and open to the public, the SoRo Festival features a live music stage, tree adoption, and over 60 vendor booths highlighting neighborhood businesses, community information and a variety of merchandise. It also offers “Camp SoRo” Kids Zone with attractions, a rock-climbing wall and free arts and crafts for children. This year’s theme is “Many Neighborhoods Create One Great Community!”

In addition there will be a separate Public Safety Pavilion hosted by the SORO Neighborhoods Council with many exhibits and demonstrations by “First Responders” such as LAPD and LAFD.

Food

The SoRo Festival will also serve up a variety of culinary delights from some of Los Angeles’ hottest gourmet food trucks.


Main Stage

The SoRo Festival stage will spotlight live musical and dance performances from some of SoCal’s talented young performers.


Safety Stage

The Public Safety Pavilion will hold demonstrations and presentations throughout the day.


About the Festival

A non-profit undertaking, staffed entirely by volunteers, the SoRo Festival celebrates the broad diversity and sense of unity that exists among the some 45,000 people who live or work in the seven neighborhoods encompassed in the South Robertson community. It encourages beautification and revitalization of the SoRo corridor, where people can shop, dine, and enjoy a good quality of life, and it is committed to strengthening local educational institutions.

Boasting an attendance of between 8,000–12,000 people each year, the SoRo Festival’s proceeds support local schools and community improvement projects. The SoRo Community Festival is coordinated by the SoRo Community Foundation, Inc., with support from the South Robertson Neighborhoods Council. We would like to invite the entire Southern California community to join our event.

2015 Festival Committee

Chaired by: Jon Liberman & Terrence Gomes

2015 Community Town Hall Meeting: Save Water–Save LA

SORO NC is hosting a town hall meeting, Save Water—Save LA, on the topic of water conservation. This program will educate people about the drought and present ways to get involved in the solution including meeting the 25% water reduction mandate.

Save Water—Save LA

Sunday May 17th, 12–3pm
Castle Heights Elementary School
9755 Cattaraugus, 90034 (map)

Activities include:

  • E-waste drive: Bring all your old electronics for proper disposal and recycling
  • Town hall panel discussion followed by question and answer period
  • Swag bags for first 150 attendees and opportunity drawing for great prizes
  • Free rain barrel rebate sign-ups and installation education
  • Food trucks
  • Kids Corner sponsored by Green Beginnings
  • Tables with one on one discussions on various water saving topics and services.

Click here for more information, or download the printable flyer.

2015 Community Town Hall Meeting: Save Water—Save LA

Town Hall 2015: Save Water-Save LA

Learn how to hit the 25% water savings mandate

The extremity of our water shortage in California has been highly publicized as of late. But what does it really mean? Drought, Water Shortage, Conservation…and more importantly, how does it affect you? Save Water—Save LA is your key to the answer.

On May 17, 2015 from 12 to 3 pm at Castle Heights Elementary School, SORO NC is hosting a town hall meeting, Save Water—Save LA, on the topic of water conservation.

Save Water—Save LA is designed to inform and motivate people to consider water conservation in daily life. This program will educate people about the drought and present ways to get involved in the solution including meeting the 25% water reduction mandate, the cash for grass program and landscaping ideas.

From top academics, to learning how to pick native plants for your yard, to activities for the children and delicious food trucks, there is something for everyone. Bring the entire family.

Activities include:
  • E-waste drive: Bring all your old electronics for proper disposal and recycling**
  • Town hall panel discussion followed by question and answer period
  • Swag bags for first 150 attendees and opportunity drawing for great prizes
  • Free rain barrel sign-ups and installation education
  • Food Trucks
  • Kids Corner where younger kids can participate in water conservation activities
  • Meeting your local government officials

SORO NC has put together a panel of some of the top experts in the field of water and conservation to educate and recommend options everyone can do to safeguard our water supply. This will be an interactive event for the whole family. There will be a short panel discussion with question and answer period followed by an informal meet and greet with organizations at tables to learn about services and opportunities you can actually use to conserve water and meet the 25% water reduction mandate.

Panel topics covered:


Other scheduled participants:

Greywater Corps, Food and Water Watch, Rain Gutter Specialists, Grow Native Nursery, LA Waterkeeper, The House Agents/Partners Trust, Ballona Creek Renaissance, Green Gardens Group, Green Beginnings, and our political representatives.

Join us for this lively and informative town hall, Save Water—Save LA, and help us win the water wars. Together, our communities can build a water-friendly future. We hope to see you there.

**E-waste drive accepts:

  • Computer monitors & television sets
  • Computers, scanners, keyboard, speakers, mouse, printers, printer cartridges
  • DVD players, VCRs, phones, answering machines, cell phones & accessories
  • Computer batteries, cellphone batteries
  • Microwave ovens, toasters, small household electronics
Do Not Bring:
  • Major appliances (fridges, washers etc.)
  • Alkaline batteries
  • Fluourescent lamps (CFLs, lightbulbs)
  • Media (tapes, CDs etc.)

2014 SoRo Community Festival: June 1

SoRo Community Festival

Sunday, June 1 • 11am-4pm
South Robertson Boulevard between Beverlywood St. and Cattaraugus St. (just North of 10 Freeway at the Robertson Boulevard exit)

This year’s theme is “Many Neighborhoods Create One Great Community!”

Free and open to the public, the SoRo Festival features food trucks, a live music stage, tree adoption, and over 60 vendor booths highlighting neighborhood businesses, community information and a variety of merchandise. It also offers “Camp SoRo” Kids Zone with attractions, a rock-climbing wall and free arts and crafts for children.

In addition there will be a separate Public Safety Pavilion hosted by the SORO Neighborhoods Council with many exhibits and demonstrations by “First Responders” such as LAPD and LAFD.

For more information, visit our full Festival page.

Outstanding Green Citizenship Award

2017 nomination deadline: Monday, May 22


Each year the South Robertson Neighborhoods Council and SoRo Community Foundation present an award to honor a business or organization in the South Robertson community that has shown outstanding leadership in greening their business practices and workplace.

Who Can Apply?

Only businesses or organizations (including schools) with a physical location within SORO NC boundaries can apply for Award Certification. Applicants must have a staff of three or more employees and workspace of 500 square feet or more. At-home businesses are not eligible to apply. 

How to Apply

You can apply using the online form below, or by downloading the form and sending it to greenaward@soronc.org.

Judging Criteria

The judges will be a committee of representatives from the SoRo Community Foundation, the SORO NC Green Team and former award recipients. The criteria that follow are the “gold standard.” In making a judgment as to which applicant should receive the award, the committee does not expect that the applicant complies with all of the criteria below. The committee will look for the applicant that has attempted to implement as many of these aspects as possible.



Desirable Green Practices

Again, it's not necessary to comply with all of these practices. The committee will look for the applicant that has attempted to implement as many of these aspects as possible.

General Education

  1. Track water and energy usage through utility bills. Show copies to judging committee. Set water and electricity goals and track progress.  Repair problems.
  2. Inform your customers about your business environmental efforts by posting the Green Business Certification decal in a visible location.
  3. Adopt a written Environmental Policy statement declaring your commitment to operate and give preference to purchasing sustainable and/or products containing post-consumer, recycled content. Post these standards in a visible location.

Waste Reduction

  1. Perform a self-assessment of your trash.  Identify the types and percentages of waste that are currently being generated and recycled and use the assessment to create or improve a reuse and recycling program.
  2. Recycle or reuse: paper, cardboard, mixed paper, junk mail, newspaper, glass, plastic, Styrofoam and aluminum.  Keep used paper near printers or re-use as note paper.
  3. Stock only compostable, recyclable and/or reusable kitchenware for staff use.  Avoid # 6 plastic.  Provide refillable containers for sugar, salt and pepper, etc. to avoid individual condiment packets.
  4. Compost food and organic waste via outdoor composting bins, indoor/outdoor vermi-culture systems (worm bins) or mechanical indoor composting units.
  5. Reduce garbage bin liners: do not use them or use biodegradable liners.
  6. Eliminate individual bottles of water for staff and guests and install an onsite water filtration system on faucet.
  7. Retailers eliminate single use plastic and paper bags and replace with reusable bags that are machine washable, or paper bags made with 100% recycled content and a minimum 40% post consumer recycled content. Do not use bioplastic bags made from corn or labeled “PLA” because they do not easily decompose.  Non retail businesses should provide these bags for use in the workplace.
  8. Practice efficient copying by making two-sided copies standard practice, using smaller fonts and margins, posting a diagram showing how to load paper to minimize misprints. 
  9. Reduce unwanted mail by getting removed from mailing list. (stopjunkmail.org) Purge your own mailing lists regularly.
  10. Use electronic forms and contracts.
  11. Post staff announcements, journals, etc. in single location (bulletin board) to reduce printed copies.
  12. Marketing materials should require no envelopes.  Substitute post cards or fold-and-mail.
  13. Use vendors that recycle or take back products when life cycle is over.
  14. Donate, sell, or exchange unwanted, but usable items.
  15. When appropriate, offer incentives to customers who bring in their own “to-go” dishes, or reusable bags.
  16. Use laundry service that provides reusable bags for dirty and clean linen.

Energy Efficiency

  1. Replace incandescent lamps with high efficiency alternatives, compact fluorescent, LED, dimmable cold cathode, MR 16, optical reflectors or diffusers.
  2. Show proof of regular maintenance on HVAC.
  3. In low traffic areas, use lighting controls such as motion sensors, photocells, or time clocks.
  4. Program computer monitors to sleep mode after 15 minutes or less of inactivity.
  5. Set the Energy Saver feature on photocopier as the default.
  6. Purchase Energy Star equipment/appliances.
  7. Insulate water heaters, storage tanks, hot water pipes.
  8. Use a solar water heater.
  9. Install a solar electric system.
  10. Use ventilation, or ceiling fans instead of air conditioning.
  11. Install a programmable thermostat: set at 72 degrees with nighttime setting of 55 degrees. 
  12. Replace leaky, broken windows with double pane, low-E, energy efficient windows.
  13. Apply window film to reduce solar heat gain on clear, single pane non-northern facing windows.
  14. Shade sun exposed windows and walls during the warm season: use awnings, sunscreens, shade trees or shrubbery.
  15. Weather strip windows and doors.
  16. Implement an organization-wide policy encouraging staff to turn off equipment and lights when not in use.
  17. Place “turn off light” labels on switches.
  18. Use standby mode on equipment, energy saver buttons on copiers.
  19. Clean skylights, light fixtures, and diffusers regularly for optimal light output.

Water Efficiency & Urban Run-Off

  1. Provide water bills for pre and post changes.
  2. Regularly check for and repair leaks.
  3. Replace pre-1992 toilets (3 gal.) and urinals with more efficient alternatives that use 1.6 gal. gpf or less.
  4. Clean outdoor areas with broom and damp mop instead of hose.
  5. Do not wash cars, equipment, floor mats where runoff water flows into the storm drain.
  6. Keep receiving areas and dumpsters clear of litter.  Ensure tight fitting lids.
  7. Adjust sprinkler times according to laws and seasons.  Sprinkler runoff is prohibited.  No spray irrigation between 10 am and 4 pm.
  8. Install faucet aerators or flow restrictors facility wide.
  9. Post signs in restrooms and kitchens to encourage water conservation and to report leaks.  Run dishwasher only when full.
  10. Clean litter and debris in front of your organization on regular basis to minimize litter entering storm drains.
  11. Install water efficient shrubs or ground cover, mulch exposed soil to retain water, whenever possible use drip irrigation.
  12. Install a cistern or rain barrel to catch rainwater.
  13. Install gray water system (City permit required)
  14. Redirect downspouts to landscaped areas
  15. Use pool covers to reduce evaporation and heat loss.

Pollution Prevention & Chemical Use

  1. Stock refillable, non-toxic, biodegradable cleaners, with trigger spray bottles not aerosol cans. (greenseal.org or ecologo.org)
  2. Educate cleaning staff of your eco-friendly preference and provide them with safety data sheets in both English and Spanish.
  3. Drop off hazardous waste at city facilities.  This includes: rechargeable and alkaline batteries, paint, used toner and ink-jet cartridges, cleaning chemicals, CFL’s and fluorescent tubes, electronics, aerosol cans that are not empty, pesticides, medicines.
  4. Request that your pest control or landscape contractor reduce their use of pesticides.  Get their commitment in writing.  Apply pesticides on an “as-needed” basis.  Use traps, contained baits, gels and barriers whenever possible.
  5. Use natural reed diffuser or trigger spray deodorizers and disinfectants.
  6. Use low or zero VOC non-toxic paint products and office supplies (white out, dry erase markers), substitute with water based pens and markers.
  7. Use unbleached/chlorine free paper products.
  8. Obtain battery recharger for office use.  Use rechargeable instead of disposable batteries for flashlights, radios, remote controls, etc.

Sustainable Procurement & Eco-Purchasing

  1. Use post-consumer recycled content office paper, letterhead, business cards, file folders, envelopes, paper towels, napkins, shipping boxes.
  2. Use remanufactured toner cartridges
  3. Contact CalMAX (California Materials Exchange) or other materials exchange programs before purchasing equipment.  ciwmb.ca.gov/CalMAX, lashares.org
  4. Request that deliveries come in returnable, reusable containers.

Transportation Management

  1. Encourage the use of rapid transit and ridesharing among staff and post maps and information on bulletin board.  Give incentives to staff who use public transit and ride share.
  2. Make organization bike-friendly for staff and customers. Give incentives to staff and customers, perform business errands on bike, provide bike racks.

SORO Tree Planting: Pico!

SORO NC tackles phase 2 of our tree planting efforts with a focus on Pico Boulevard. But we need your help.

Volunteer to help beautify Pico

Sunday, April 28 • 9:30am (sharp!)

City Parking Lot on Pico Blvd. between Livonia and Robertson (map)

Bring: please bring a broom for cleanup around tree well, and camera (optional) for fun pictures. We will supply shovel, gloves, tree, tree stakes and ties, soil amendments.

  • Volunteers can be of all ages and ability levels—there will be less-physical jobs, too.
  • Each tree will require a crew of 7 volunteers to be planted, so consider organizing a small team of friends!
  • Kids are welcome, as are families and groups of friends/neighbors who would like to work together.

SORO NC supports moratorium on "fracking"

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE:

SORO NC supports Koretz/Wesson moratorium on "fracking"


LOS ANGELES, California (21 September 2012) - The South Robertson Neighborhoods Council (SORO NC) voted Thursday to support a Los Angeles City Council motion calling for a moratorium on the controversial practice of hydraulic fracturing, or "fracking."

The City motion, co-sponsored by LA Councilmember Paul Koretz and Council President Herb Wesson, calls for "… the Governor of the State of California, the Los Angeles Board of Supervisors, and the Division of Oil, Gas and Geothermal Resources (DOGGR) to move swiftly to place a moratorium on hydraulic fracturing and on the disposal of fracking wastewater by injection wells, until DOGGR, in conjunction with local and state authorities and an independent third party reviewer, makes a determination that such processes are safe for public health, for the water supply and for the environment.”

Concerned about the lack of both state and local regulations governing the process of fracking, the SORO NC Board called for "an immediate adoption and enforcement of regulations governing [fracking's] practice, in order to protect our environment, community, homes, and citizens."
 
The SORO NC resolution also supports the Culver City Council’s July 2012 Resolution R057 “to immediately place a ban on hydraulic fracturing and on the disposal of “fracking” wastewater by injection wells until the State of California and DOGGR takes all necessary and appropriate actions to adopt, implement and enforce comprehensive regulations concerning the practice of fracking that will ensure that public health and safety and the environment will be adequately protected.”
 
Hydraulic fracturing is the process in which a high volume of water, sand and chemicals is forced into the earth under enormous pressure causing shale to "fracture," releasing oil and gas and creating large volumes of contaminated wastewater.  SORO NC's primary concerns are:
  1. The safe disposal of thousands of gallons of toxic wastewater, which can also result in the contamination of underground aquifers.  Fracking contaminants such as benzene, diesel fuel, high levels of fluoride, surfactant 2-BE and other chemicals have been found in aquifers in over 1000 documented cases. (ProPublica, “Buried Secrets: Is Natural Gas Drilling Endangering U.S. Water Supplies?,” Nov. 13, 2008.)  According to an EPA report dated Dec. 2011, fracking resulted in groundwater contamination in Pavilion, Wyoming (Los Angeles Times, “Culver City Councils Calls on State to Ban Fracking Temporarily,” July 3, 2012). Furthermore, it is unclear what government agencies are responsible for the monitoring and the processing of fracking wastewater.
  2. The large amount of water required in the process of hydraulic fracturing when California water is a scarce resource.  Fracking in the Inglewood Oil Field, located partially in Culver City, produced 126 million barrels of toxic wastewater in 2011.(Mar Vista Resolution) Furthermore, according to the Inglewood Oil Field EIR, 100 new wells are planned for the Culver City section of the Inglewood Oil Field over the next 20 years.
  3. Earth instability, including earthquakes, can result from injection wells according to a U.S. Geological Survey conducted in March, 2012. In addition, there is concern about the rupture of wells resulting from regularly occurring earthquakes in California and whether or not these ruptures can be quickly detected if they happen.  The Inglewood Oil Field lies above the Newport-Inglewood Fault line. (Los Angeles Times, “Culver City Council Calls on State to Ban Fracking Temporarily,” July 3, 2012) It is also true that a large insurer, Nationwide Mutual Insurance Co., will no longer pay for “damage related to …gas drilling”. (Associated Press, U.S. Insurer Won’t Cover Gas Drill Fracking Exposure, Albany, N.Y. July 12, 2012)
  4. Air pollution, which has been measured at five times above federal hazard standards near fracking sites, are a direct result of truck traffic, large generators, compressors, drills, (University of Colorado study). This pollution can jeopardize efforts to reduce green house gas emissions to 1990 levels by 2020 as mandated by AB 32.

The Inglewood Oil Field in Culver City is comprised of 1000 acres, making it the largest urban oil field in the nation (KTLA News, July 3, 2012). South Robertson is Culver City’s neighbor to the north. 10% of the oil field's surface is in Culver City, but Culver City sits on 20% of the underground portion of the oilfield (as defined by the state’s Division of Oil, Gas and Geothermal Resources or “DOGGR”). 
 
After attending a fracking workshop, hosted by the State of California’s DOGGR, the Culver City council members “were prompted to vote on the resolution [banning fracking] after receiving very little information from the workshop.” (Los Angeles Times, “Culver City Council Calls on State to Ban Fracking Temporarily,” July 3, 2012). In addition, the South Robertson Neighborhood Council joins with South Robertson’s LA County Supervisor, Mark Ridley-Thomas, in support of State Assembly Bill 972 that calls for a moratorium. 

About SORO NC
The South Robertson Neighborhoods Council (SORO NC) is chartered and funded by the City of Los Angeles to promote citizen participation in government at a grassroots level. SORO NC gives area stakeholders a voice in the issues, decisions and programs that affect their lives; provides a direct line of communication to the City to help address their unique needs; and builds a stronger community, one step at a time.
 
Contact:
Paula Waxman, Green Team Co-Chair
greenteamchair@soronc.org
310-295-9920

# # #

Learn more about Genetically Modified (GMO) food

Panel Discussion: Mandatory Labeling of GMO Foods

Thursday, September 6 • 7-9pm (starts promptly)
Hamilton High School Cafeteria (map) • Parking available

On Thursday, September 6th, Hamilton students and the SORO NC Green Team will be putting on a educational evening to discuss Proposition 37 (currently on the November ballot) which would require mandatory labeling of GMO foods produced in California. It is a rare opportunity to learn about a complex ballot measure issue from all sides of the debate and to be able to ask questions of the experts. These eight exceptional students have worked all summer to put on this extraordinary event.

The impressive roster includes advocates on both sides of the issue explaining their positions in depth (you can see the speaker list here). If you think that this is not a nuanced issue, you might be surprised after hearing this interesting panel of speakers.

The event is open to the community and there will be a Q & A following. Any questions concerning this event can be directed to Green Team co-chair Paula Waxman or by phone at 310 559-2552.

2012 Outstanding Green Citizenship Award winner: Pico Cleaners

A shining example of outstanding green citizenship, Pico Cleaners has won this year's Outstanding Green Citizenship Award at the 2012 SoRo Festival.

Through its workplace environment, environmental practices, educational philosophy, and environmental leadership, Pico Cleaners has shown itself to be an outstanding steward of the earth. Among its many programs, Pico Cleaners helped pioneer an innovative, eco-friendly dry cleaning process that has no hazardous chemicals or petroleum products, with no negative impact on the air, water or soil.

We hope that Pico Cleaners' example will inspire other businesses and schools in the community to emulate their efforts to improve the environment of the community and the planet.

Tree Planting on Robertson: 100 Volunteers Needed

In 2011, SORO NC dedicated over 25% of its annual budget towards the purchase of new trees for Robertson Blvd. between Cadillac and Cattaraugus. This month, with the support of Council Districts 5 and 10 and Million Trees LA, we tackle Phase 1 with a one-day blitz. But we need your help.

Volunteer to help beautify Robertson

Saturday, March 24 • 8am to noon

Hamilton High parking lot (map)
Bring: gardening/work gloves, sun block, water in a reusable bottle, a hat, and closed-toe shoes

  • Volunteers can be of all ages and ability levels—there will be less-physical jobs, too.
  • Each tree will require a crew of 7 volunteers to be planted, so consider organizing a small team of friends!
  • Kids are welcome, as are families and groups of friends/neighbors who would like to work together.
  • Council President Wesson and Council Member Koretz will be there planting along side us.

Volunteers should register in advance with Paula Waxman at greenteamchair@soronc.org or 310-559-2552. More information can be found on our volunteer flyer.

We're planting Chinese Elms—carefully selected in collaboration with Million Trees LA—hardy, good for public spaces, and designed to grow tall with a large lacy canopy. They'll provide greenery, shade, noise reduction and make Robertson businesses more attractive.

We'll fill in all the empty tree wells with new trees and cut new tree wells into the sidewalk where none exist. In addition, we've funded a two-year watering and maintenance program, to ensure that the trees are properly cared for and can grow strong, healthy roots. We hope they'll survive beyond all of our lifetimes.

This is just the beginning of a larger cooperative effort to revitalize Robertson. We hope you can join us.

Green Living: free environmental workshops for all

Beginning next month on October 13th, environmental experts from Sustainable Works will begin the first of three six-workshop series conducted at three different venues convenient to SORO residents: Westside Pavilion (Oct 2011), Fairfax High School (Oct 2011), and Temple Isaiah (April 2012).

These classes are being offered for FREE via a $45,000 grant secured by Council District 5 through LADWP and the US Department of Energy.

The six-week workshops meet once a week for 90 minutes. Over the course of the six evenings, you will learn how to reduce your impact on the earth by living more sustainable lives, as well as practical information for how to reduce your energy and water bills, reduce your waste and make better consumer choices regarding transportation and food. Each attendee will get lots of free goodies such as aerators, low-flow showerheads, CFL's, and tire pressure gauges. In addition, each evening, Sustainable Works will conduct a free raffle of compost bins, worm bins, rain barrels and many more items. Download the workshop flyer for more information.

For dates, times, and addresses and to pre-register for any series visit:

Westside Pavilion

Starts Thursday October 13th • 7-8:30pm • runs for six Thursdays
Register online or at 310-458-8716 ext. 2

Fairfax High School

Starts Tuesday October 18th • 7-8:30pm • runs for six Tuesdays
Register online or at 310-458-8716 ext. 2

Temple Isaiah

Starts Monday April 16th • 7-8:30pm • runs for six Mondays
Register at 310-458-8716 ext. 2

Council Member Paul Koretz of Council District 5 said:
"Every day, we make decisions that can have a positive or negative impact on the earth, with every one of us playing a vital role. I hope these programs can show all of us—our neighbors, friends and relatives, that we no longer need to feel overwhelmed by ballooning water and energy bills. Although we face diminishing resources, our communities must be empowered by the knowledge that our simple day-to-day choices can have a direct impact on our present and future lives."

Don’t pass up this wonderful opportunity to learn how you can reduce your impact on mother earth. Sign up for a class and share this information with your neighbors and community. We'll all be better off for it.

SUNDAY IN THE GARDEN (4/17) from 10 to noon

Hi friends, neighbors, garden clubbers, and greenies,

We will really need help in the garden this weekend between 10 and noon to clean out beds 5 and 6 to ready them for corn and tomatoes. We are slowly getting our Spring/Summer plantings up. We planted watermelons, zucchini, beans, strawberries last week and harvested the last of the beans. Bring friends and water. Come in thru the Canfield/Kramerwood walk thru gate.

Hugs,
Paula